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3-232 (Text)

Item metadata
Speaker:
author,male,Deniehy, Daniel Henry,36 addressee,female
ns1:discourse_type
Letter
Word Count :
409
Plaint Text :
ns1:register
Private Written
ns1:texttype
Private Correspondence
ns1:localityName
http://dbpedia.org/resource/New_South_Wales
Created:
1864
Identifier
3-232
Source
Deniehy, 1884
pages
32-33
Document metadata
Extent:
2218
Identifier
3-232-plain.txt
Title
3-232#Text
Type
Text

3-232-plain.txt — 2 KB

File contents



128, ELIZABETH ST., SYDNEY. 
Oct. 7th, 1864. 
MY DARLING WIFE,- The number above is that of the new office I have taken. People are gradually coming round me; and without wishing to show myself over sanguine, I think I shall do very well eventually. For the present I am mainly engaged in literary matters, but these, except as a help, and not as a dependence, I shall quit at as early a date as possible. This, however, is certain, that while nothing at all was to be done at Melbourne, something perhaps in a little while, a good deal can be done here. Meantime the only thing is to go on steadily and patiently "to labour and to wait." It is bad at this time of day, this beginning the World over again; but it must be done now or never. Occasionally, at night, I feel more depressed and wretched than I think any human being, in Australia at all events, ever before felt. I keep at home, not going out or visiting anywhere, entering nohotels, and if from intense depression I take a little brandy, it is only in my own room at night. 
"Things are really looking more hopeful to-day, and, please Heaven, we shall yet see better times. 
"Here is something that will please you. Amongst the few men acquaintances I have made is a native born barrister, a Mr. Barton, the Editor of Punch. He told me that when studying at the Temple in London, 'How I became Attorney-General of New Barataria,' reached there from New South Wales; and though they did not understand the 'hits,' or know the individuals sketched, he assured me the English law students and barristers resident in the Temple were charmed with it. But enough of this; I have no heart or mind to feel or write about anything but yourself and the children. I hope speedily to be in possession of sufficient funds to send for you and render your passage a comfortable one. Now, my dearest, if you care for me, and would preserve something to me worth living and striving for, take care of your health, and keep your mind as easy as you can. Think as little of the past as possible, for it will not be my fault if all is not yet well with us. Kiss my darlings for me, and believe me 
Ever your lover and husband, 
D. H. DENIEHY." 
MRS. DENIEHY." 

http://ns.ausnc.org.au/corpora/cooee/source/3-232#Text